HIGH-QUALITY & ENGAGING COURSES

Unlocking the magic of learning for 6-12th grade learners

StrongMind proudly offers robust, high-quality courses for grades 6-12. Students enjoy captivating lessons for math, English language arts, science, social studies, and a variety of electives.

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EXPLORE OUR COURSES

English Language Arts

A combination of high-interest readings, standards-applicable activities, and real-world critical thinking skills, the Language Arts courses reflect careful consideration and research of literature and composition concepts. Projects, activities, and lessons are designed to be motivational, realistic, and engaging while fostering a love of literature and a can-do attitude for writing. Honors courses are available where indicated with *.

MIDDLE SCHOOL

English 6

First Semester:
Students read and analyze various informational texts, including biographies, personal accounts of events, instructional documents, film reviews, and persuasive letters. Reading selections include the novel The Road by Jack London and informational texts on topics such as the science behind sunsets, the lives of important historical figures, the history of the Olympics, and the process of flotation used by archaeologists. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as explicit and implicit information, central ideas and key details, and claims and arguments.

 

Second Semester:
Students read literary texts from various genres, including novels, short stories, poems, and plays. Students read the entire novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum and excerpts from Little Women and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Students also read poetry by Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Frost, and Carl Sandburg and watch several videos of famous poems being read aloud. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as explicit and implicit information, theme, characters, plot, poetic techniques, and figurative language.

Course Intro Video

English 7

First Semester:
Students read and analyze informational texts, including biographies, personal accounts of events, presidential speeches, and persuasive letters. Students read the biography The Story of My Life by Helen Keller. Students also examine informational texts about historical figures such as Jane Goodall and Zora Neale Hurston; places like Dubai, the Galapagos Islands, and the Hoover Dam; and the similarities between country music and hip-hop. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as explicit and implicit information, central ideas and key details, and claims and arguments.

 

Second Semester:
Students read literary texts from various genres, including novels, short stories, fairy tales, poems, and plays. Students read the entire novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll and excerpts from Black Beauty. Students also read poetry by Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, William Wordsworth, and others. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as comparing how written texts are portrayed in film or audio and ways to understand explicit and implicit information, theme, characters, plot, poetic and dramatic techniques, and figurative language.

Course Intro Video

English 8

First Semester:
Students read and analyze literary and informational texts, including novels, short stories, myths, poems, magazine articles, and autobiographies. Students read the novel The Call of the Wild and short stories such as “The Lottery” and “The Tell-Tale Heart.” These reading selections, along with infographics and videos, demonstrate concepts such as explicit and implicit information;
theme; central idea; figurative language; and the basics of grammar, usage, and punctuation. Students also plan, create, write, revise, and edit a fictional narrative.

 

Second Semester:
Students read literary and informational texts, including novels, short stories, poems, articles, and political speeches. Students read excerpts from the novels Fahrenheit 451, Hatchet, and Black Beauty as well as informational texts about topics such as global warming, fast food, the widespread presence of corn in food, and how sleep affects learning ability. These reading selections, along with infographics and videos, demonstrate concepts such as explicit and implicit information; theme; central idea; figurative language; the basics of grammar, usage, and punctuation; and informational and argument writing.

Course Intro Video

HIGH SCHOOL

English 9*

First Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and literary texts. Students read the early fantasy novel The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald, among other texts. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as textual evidence, themes, central ideas, inferences, word choice, and figurative and connotative language. Students also compare portrayals of both literary and informational content in different mediums and learn about grammar, usage, figures of speech, and reference materials. In addition, students write a personal narrative (memoir) and a literary analysis.

 

Second Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and literary texts. Students read the dystopian novella Anthem by Ayn Rand, among other texts. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as textual evidence, themes, central ideas, characters, inferences, rhetorical techniques, structure and style, and arguments and claims. In addition, students compare works from different time periods and learn about grammar, usage, punctuation, spelling, style manuals, phrases, and clauses. Students also write an informational essay and an argument essay.

Course Intro Video

English 10*

First Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis of informational texts, argument texts, and videos. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as explicit and inferred meaning; textual evidence; central ideas; arguments and claims; organizational structures; figurative, connotative, technical, and rhetorical language; and the effect of word choice on tone. Students also learn about reference sources, spelling, grammar, usage, punctuation, domain-specific vocabulary, context clues, and affixes. In addition, students write an informational essay and an argument essay.

 

Second Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis of literary texts from around the world and across history. Students read the Greek tragedy Antigone by Sophocles, among other texts. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as textual evidence, themes, inferences, characterization, figurative language, figures of speech, and literary devices. Students also learn more about context clues, word nuances, affixes, phrases, clauses, and parallel construction. In addition, students write a literary analysis essay and a personal narrative essay.

Course Intro Video

English 11*

First Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and argument texts. Students read seminal US texts such as “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” by Frederick Douglass, as well as presidential speeches, court documents, and scientific articles. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as textual evidence, central ideas, inferences, word choice, and figurative language. Students also learn about context clues, spelling, hyphens, contested usage, figures of speech, and reference materials. In addition, students write a researched informational essay and a researched argument essay.

 

Second Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and literary texts. Students read The Crucible by Arthur Miller, among other texts. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as the literary elements of plot, setting, and character; themes; central ideas; and characteristics of poetry and drama. Students also compare works from different time periods; review context and word nuances; and learn about punctuation, style manuals, phrases, clauses, and parallel structure. In addition, students write a fictional narrative and a literary analysis.

Course Intro Video

English 12*

First Semester:
This semester covers reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and argument texts. Students read seminal US texts such as the Declaration of Independence, presidential speeches, court documents, and articles related to innovative technology. These reading selections demonstrate concepts such as rhetoric, figurative language, theme, purpose, specialized vocabulary, text structure, word nuances, inferences, research, evidence, and reference sources. In addition, students learn about context clues, word patterns as clues to meaning, contested usage, and syntax errors. Students also write a researched informational essay and a researched argument essay.

 

Second Semester:
This semester covers in-depth literary analysis using narrative texts from British literature—from the Middle Ages through modern times. The course builds in complexity, covering topics such as explicit and implicit meanings, figurative language, literary devices, central ideas, themes, and narrative and structural elements. Students write a fictional narrative in the style of Gothic Romanticism and a literary analysis comparing or contrasting two texts from different eras of British literature. These short and extended forms of writing emphasize the writing process, from note-taking and outline-making to revising and editing for content and style.

Course Intro Video

English Language Development (6-12)

English Language Development is a one-semester course that helps English language learners develop the foundations of the English language. Regardless of students’ native language, this course allows English language learners to master techniques that help them achieve greater proficiency in English. Students learn the basics of grammar, usage, and punctuation, including phrases, clauses, and sentence structures. Students also learn vocabulary words, improve their word use, and remember grammar rules. In addition, students learn how to write a paragraph, a narrative, and a poem, and they peer review a classmate’s work.

Course Intro Video

Math

Our innovative math courses help students learn to problem-solve and build important skills. With videos, interactives, and other supports, students are engaged in learning and can master concepts in subject areas like algebra, geometry, and advanced math. Honors courses are available where indicated with *.

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Math 6

First Semester:
Students build on previously learned concepts such as adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing. They deepen their knowledge of arithmetic with fractions and work with decimals and negative numbers. They apply these new skills to help solve real-world problems using statistics, ratios, unit conversions, and geometry, and they expand their ability to write and evaluate expressions, including ones involving new concepts like variables and exponents. Students also begin working with equations and learn what it means to solve them.

 

Second Semester:
Students build on concepts such as positive and negative integers and fractions to learn about rational numbers and how to compare them. They find the distance between points on the number line and in the coordinate plane, and then they solve geometry problems involving these concepts. They study the relationships between variables and how to represent them. They also learn about ratios and unit rates, and then use them to solve real-world problems. Finally, students work with data and discover different ways to display and mathematically describe data.

Course Intro Video

Math 7

First Semester:
Students add and multiply rational numbers by using number lines, rules, and properties. They learn how to solve problems by finding and comparing unit rates, they rewrite expressions using properties, and they write and solve simple linear equations by using different methods. Then, they move their focus to probability and statistics, where they interpret and calculate simple probabilities and learn about populations and samples. Students then work on geometry topics by solving problems involving scale drawings, circles, and angle relationships. Students also draw some geometric shapes.

 

Second Semester:
Students subtract and divide rational numbers by using different methods, and they apply strategies to perform four operations. They study and interpret proportional relationships and equivalent expressions, and they write and solve linear equations and inequalities to solve real-world problems. Next, they compare two data sets of random samples by using their center values and variability measures, and they make conclusions about their populations. Finally, students work on geometry topics and solve problems that involve the area, surface area, volume, and cross-sections of two- or three-dimensional objects.

Course Intro Video

Math 8

First Semester:
Students start working with rational and irrational numbers. Then they solve linear equations from contextual situations and analyze properties of functions, focusing on linear functions. The next area of study is very large and very small numbers, where students work on numbers in scientific notation. They then move on to geometry and perform rigid transformations on figures before they prove congruence of figures through a series of rigid transformations.

 

Second Semester:
Students solve multi-step equations and proportions. They apply their knowledge of proportional relationships to geometry, where they perform transformations on figures and prove similarity
of figures through a series of transformations. Next, students analyze linear relationships and functions. Students also learn how to solve systems of linear equations using different methods. Then they build upon their algebraic skills by applying them to statistics, where they analyze and interpret patterns in bivariate data. Finally, students work with circular three-dimensional objects to find their volumes.

Course Intro Video

Pre-Algebra (6-9)

In this one-semester math course, students start with a review of integers and rational numbers. Then they move into properties of numbers, including working with exponents and roots, and mastering the order of operations. Students also learn about variables and how to simplify expressions and solve multi-step equations. Finally, they study lines and linear equations, and along the way, they work with ordered pairs, the coordinate plane, and graphs.

Course Intro Video

HIGH SCHOOL

Algebra 1* (9-12)

First Semester:
Students apply properties to simplify expressions with exponents and radicals, and they explore the relationships between rational and irrational numbers. Then students solve linear equations and inequalities and use their knowledge of linear equations and inequalities to solve and graph systems of linear equations and inequalities. Next, students apply operations on polynomials and explore factoring quadratic expressions. Finally, students solve quadratic equations by using different methods, including technology, and they work with systems that contain quadratic equations.

 

Second Semester:
Students focus mainly on learning and analyzing functions. They study with different types of functions presented as equations, graphs, tables, and verbal descriptions, and they identify their key features and apply them to real-world problems. Students also use key features to compare different types of functions to each other. Then they explore transformations of functions. The course concludes with a study of statistics, where students learn about interpreting and analyzing data sets, as well as causation and correlation.

Course Intro Video

Geometry* (9-12)

First Semester:
Students build upon their understanding of geometric concepts by working through a variety of geometric problems, writing formal proofs, and constructing geometric figures. Transformations are used to explain the concepts of congruent and similar figures with a focus on the properties of congruent and similar triangles. These properties are proved as students become familiar with postulates, theorems, and formal proofs. The course wraps up with trigonometric ratios and their applications to real-world situations.

 

Second Semester:
Students build upon their understanding of geometric concepts by working through a variety of geometric problems, writing formal proofs, and constructing geometric figures. They learn about slopes, midpoints, and the distance formula, with a focus on their applications in coordinate proofs. Next, students work with theorems about circles, as well as concepts related to circles. Finally, the course wraps up with two- and three-dimensional figures and probability.

Course Intro Video

Algebra 2* (9-12)

First Semester:
Students learn about and perform operations with complex numbers. They solve quadratic equations with complex solutions, and then they work with polynomials. They perform operations on polynomials, use polynomial identities to solve problems, analyze polynomial functions using different representations, and solve polynomial equations graphically. Finally, they work with rational functions. They perform arithmetic operations on rational functions and learn how to graph them.

 

Second Semester:
Students begin with solving rational equations. Then they work with radical equations. They learn how to rewrite expressions involving radicals and how to graph and solve radical equations. Next, students move on to concepts of trigonometry. They learn about trigonometric ratios and use the unit circle to understand them. They graph sine, cosine, and tangent functions and explore their key features. Finally, students prove and apply trigonometric identities.

Course Intro Video

College Mathematics Preparation (12)

First Semester:
Students model real-life situations with equations and inequalities, expand their skills with solving exponential equations with logarithms, and synthesize and generalize a variety of function families.

 

Second Semester:
Students learn how to make probability decisions, as well as how to use basic statistics and sampling processes to understand data sets and answer questions about samples and populations.

Course Intro Video

Financial Mathematics (9-12)

Students learn to apply the skills they learn to solve real-life problem, and analyze current financial issues of taxes, loans, car leases, mortgages, insurance. Mathematical processes are used to study patterns and analyze data, algebraic formulas, graphs, amortization modeling.

 

Schools may use this course independently or pair with Applied Mathematics to create a Math Models full-year course.

Course Intro Video

Applied Mathematics (9-12)

Students examine how artists, video game developers, and musicians apply mathematical concepts to create and even how biologists use mathematics to measure the distances between cells and gain new insights about the body. Students apply concepts from geometry, functions, probability, and statistics.

 

Schools may use this course independently or pair with Financial Mathematics to create a Math Models full-year course.

Course Intro Video

Science

Our robust science courses explore various science topics, including biology, ecology, chemistry, physical science, and earth science. Courses focus on both the understanding and application of science topics and embed concepts for engineering and technology throughout. Virtual and hands-on projects help students further apply their knowledge during courses. Honors courses are available where indicated with *.

Science

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Science 6

First Semester:
This semester focuses mainly on plants and animals. The course begins with an introduction to cells. The course then continues with the hierarchy of organization, covering tissues, organs, and organ systems. Once students learn what makes up organisms, they look at the interactions between them. The course also covers the growth of plants and animals and what factors affect their growth. Students track the life cycles of plants and animals and find out how they reproduce.

 

Second Semester:
Coming Soon.

Course Intro Video

Science 7

First Semester:
This semester focuses on science concepts from the fields of chemistry, biology, and ecology. It begins by exploring the relationship between matter and energy. Next, the course examines chemical reactions. Students then use their knowledge of matter, energy, and chemical reactions to build on their understanding of cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Finally, students uncover the world of synthetic materials to see how they are made and how they impact society.

 

Second Semester:
This semester focuses on science concepts from the fields of ecology and geology. It begins by exploring the interactions between and among organisms in an ecosystem. Next, the course examines types of rocks, the rock cycle, and Earth’s resources. Students explore how Earth’s processes can lead to natural hazard events and severe weather. Students then discover how technology can help during these disasters, as well as other benefits of technology. Finally, students track some of Earth’s changes through time.

Course Intro Video

Science 8

First Semester:
This semester focuses on life science concepts, from biology, ecology, and environmental sciences. Students start by looking at the nature of science before moving on to its discoveries. Students begin with an introduction to scientific processes. Then, they explore cells, heredity, and evolution. Then, it’s on to even bigger questions, with ecology and genetic technology. The course also includes engineering and technology practices.

 

Second Semester:
This semester focuses on physical science concepts, including topics from chemistry and physics. Students begin by exploring the history of science. The course highlights influential scientists who laid the groundwork for the fields students are about to discover. Next, students begin with physics—one of the more interactive sciences, and one that can be seen in action every day. Students explore concepts of velocity and acceleration, then they dive into forces and Newton’s laws of motion. After that, they explore chemistry, including the periodic table, acids and bases, and chemical reactions.

Course Intro Video

Science 8 - NGSS Integrated Science (8)

Science 8 – NGSS Integrated Science is the second semester of an eighth-grade science course.
In this course, students focus on ideas from physical science, such as physics and space science. They begin by exploring the history of science. The course highlights influential scientists who laid the groundwork for the fields students are about to discover. Next, students begin with physics—one of the more interactive sciences, and one that can be seen in action every day. Students explore concepts of velocity and acceleration, then they dive into forces and Newton’s laws of motion. Students also explore space, including the solar system, planets, and the Moon.

Course Intro Video

HIGH SCHOOL

Physical Science (9-12)

First Semester:
This semester introduces students to the world of chemistry. Students start by looking at science as a whole. This means learning the methods and tools that scientists use to get meaningful results. Students then explore the structure and properties of matter—and how it changes in response to energy. Next, students practice reading and interpreting the periodic table. From there, students learn to use and interpret chemical names, formulas, equations, and models. Students also discover the types and properties of reactions, mixtures, solutions, acids, and bases. Finally, students examine nuclear reactions and their uses. Throughout the course, students also explore historical perspectives and the modern social impact of these topics.

 

Second Semester:
This semester introduces students to the world of physics. Students start by discovering what it means to be scientific. By looking at the ways scientists think, communicate, and do their jobs, students form a strong foundation for learning the sciences. Next, the course covers important aspects of motion and force, including the motion of fluids and Newton’s laws. Building up from
these beginnings, students explore thermodynamics, energy, work, and machines. Next is the nature and properties of waves, followed by electricity and magnetism. Alongside their exploration
of the scientific method, students work on a course project that introduces them to the field of engineering.

Course Intro Video

Biology* (9-12)

First Semester:
This semester covers the basics of biochemistry and how it relates to life. Biology helps students understand the life all around them—as well as how they affect certain systems on Earth. It also helps students understand themselves on a biological level. In this course, students use logical thinking to identify relationships and draw conclusions. The course expands out from the building blocks of biochemistry to individual cells, and cell membranes. From there, the topic shifts to cell division and reproduction. Finally, the course describes cell energy and metabolism, and photosynthesis.

 

Second Semester:
This semester covers the basics of genetics and the technology used to better understand it. The first step is to explore genetics, DNA, and the genetic code. Students discover how organisms have evolved due to natural selection. They also explore ecology, and how matter and energy flow through ecosystems. These topics can help students see a bigger picture of the living world around them. Students apply ethical guidelines to biological research. This includes engaging in a discussion about the ethics and implications of new biotechnology. Students also model the
flow of matter and energy in ecosystems. This investigation shows how changes to the flow affect organisms in their environment.

Course Intro Video

Chemistry* (9-12)

First Semester:
This semester covers the basic principles and properties of matter. These concepts enhance students’ grasp of chemistry and its everyday uses. Chemistry opens the atomic world to students. Using the atomic model, students learn how chemical reactions can be predicted. Once scientists understand reactions, they can be engineered to provide people with energy and needed materials. Students start with the building blocks of chemistry, with atoms, bonding, and the periodic table. Next, students move to the next size up: molecules. After that, students build on these ideas with a look at reactions, stoichiometry, and the link between reactions and energy.

 

Second Semester:
This semester expands upon the basic understanding of chemistry. The course begins with an overview of the properties of matter. These include the types of bonds and forces that hold atoms and molecules together. After that, the course explores the states of matter, phase changes, gas laws, and solutions. Then, the course moves into the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. This explains why some reactions give off heat, while others consume it. The course also discusses chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry. Finally, the course explores radiation and the difference between nuclear fission and fusion. By the end of this course, students are able to evaluate the ethical and social implications of chemistry related technologies.

Course Intro Video

Social Studies

StrongMind Social Studies courses focus on the study of the past and how it applies to the future. Throughout the courses, students develop their understanding of the past by studying primary sources, comparing social movements, and exploring ancient cultures. Honors courses are available where indicated with *.

Social Studies

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Social Studies 6

First Semester:
Students study the geographical, social, economic, and political foundations for early civilizations. They analyze the shift from nomadic societies to agricultural societies. Students study the development of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Ancient Israel, and India. The study of these civilizations includes the impact of geography, early history, cultural development, and economic change. The geographic focus includes the study of physical and political features, economic development and resources, and migration patterns. This class concludes with the Gupta dynasty.

 

Second Semester:
Coming Soon.

Course Intro Video

Social Studies 7

First Semester:
This semester explores the social, cultural, and technological changes that occurred in Europe, Africa, and Asia in the years AD 500–1789. After reviewing the ancient world and the ways in which archaeologists and historians uncover the past, students study the history and geography of great civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout the world during medieval and early modern times. These include the Roman Empire, the early Muslim empires, and empires in Africa, the Americas, and east Asia.

 

Second Semester:
Students study the Renaissance, Reformation, and the Age of Exploration, examining the growing economic interaction among civilizations. Students learn about the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and commodities. They learn about the growth of Enlightenment philosophy and the new examination of the concepts of reason and authority, the natural rights of human beings and the divine right of kings, experimentalism in science, and the dogma of belief. Finally, students assess the political forces let loose by the Enlightenment, particularly the rise of democratic ideas, and the continuing influence of these ideas in the world today.

Course Intro Video

Social Studies 8

First Semester:
Students begin by exploring how American Indian societies lived in their environments. Next, they examine reasons for European exploration and settlement in North America. Students then explore the development of the British colonies and the causes behind the American Revolution. They learn how the Patriots were able to defeat Great Britain and achieve independence. They will be able to name the documents that define the democratic nature of our American republic. They learn why the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are so revolutionary. Throughout the course, students study the growth of sectional divisions and conflict.

 

Second Semester:
Students journey from early Spanish missions in western North America to the end of the 19th century in the United States. Students examine reasons for westward exploration and expansion.
They then explore the causes and effects of the Texas Revolution and the Mexican-American War. They also analyze the California gold rush and immigration to the West Coast. They then explore the sectional causes and effects of the Civil War. Students then examine the changes to African American lives during Reconstruction, followed by the economic growth of the Second Industrial Revolution. The Indian Wars of the 19th century are also studied.

Course Intro Video

HIGH SCHOOL

World History* (9-12)

First Semester:
This semester explores key events and historical developments from hunter-gatherer societies to the Industrial Revolution. It begins with analysis of prehistoric people from the Paleolithic era to the Agricultural Revolution. The course follows the rise and fall of early empires and the fall of the Roman Empire. The course analyzes the Crusades, feudalism, the plague, and Asian empires. It explores the effects of the Renaissance and Protestant Reformation. The course follows European explorers who sought new trade routes to Asia, the discovery of the Americas, the slave trade, and the emergence of the American colonies. It also analyzes important revolutions in history.

 

Second Semester:
This semester traces the developments of the last 250 years. It begins by examining the origins of modern Western imperialism. This includes the influence of the Industrial Revolution. The course analyzes the cultural, economic, and political impacts that imperialism had on Africa and Asia, including the rise of Japan. It examines how imperialism and nationalism contributed to the outbreak of World War I. It considers how the Treaty of Versailles contributed to the rise of fascism in Europe and the start of World War II. The course also analyzes the destructive nature
of 20th-century warfare and atrocities such as the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust.

Course Intro Video

U.S. History* (9-12)

First Semester:
This semester begins with European exploration and the impact Europeans had on the lives of those native to North America. The course traces the development of the English colonies in North America, the causes and effects of the American Revolution, and the ratification of the Constitution. The course then examines the causes of the War of 1812. Throughout the course, the topic of sectionalism is analyzed through the study of various events, including westward expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. This semester also examines the Indian Wars, immigration, and the Second Industrial Revolution.

 

Second Semester:
This semester continues the story of the United States. It begins with the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. This is followed by World War I and the economic boom known as the “Roaring Twenties.” After studying the Great Depression and the New Deal, the course then traces America’s involvement in World War II, the Cold War, and proxy conflicts like the Vietnam War and Korean War. Students learn about pivotal events in the presidential administrations of the second half of the 20th century. This semester examines events as the United States emerges into the 21st century, including technology innovations, global communications, and the rise of terrorism.

Course Intro Video

U.S. Government (9-12)

US Government provides students with basic knowledge of the history and philosophy of the United States government and its principles, which guide our democracy. Students examine the United States Constitution in order to answer questions and determine the facts of government. The course focuses on the functions and duties of the three branches of government. Special attention is given to political participation, the rights and responsibilities of citizens, and government systems of the world. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, and the media in shaping the government. The Supreme Court is presented as the “voice of reason” in the balance of powers.

Course Intro Video

Civics and Citizenship (9-12)

This course guides students in preparing to take the Naturalization Test designed by the United States federal government. The course is for high school students in order to fulfill the requirement for graduation. Civics and Citizenship provides students the ability to engage with the government in which they will soon participate. This course provides real-world connections between democratic ideals and practical activities.

Course Intro Video

Economics (9-12)

Economics explores principles that allow students to make informed decisions about personal finance. In this course, students develop a broader understanding of national and international economic decisions and policies. These principles will help students understand why economics impacts history, the distribution of wealth, and the quality of life for all members of society.

Course Intro Video

Electives

With StrongMind, students enjoy a variety of electives to choose from, many of which include career and technical education (CTE) components design to help them learn about and explore different CTE pathways. Whether students are learning about world cultures and languages, graphic design, or taking a physical education course, students will gain valuable skills.

Electives

GENERAL

Character Education (6-12)

In this course, students learn about important values: truthfulness and trustworthiness. Responsibility, diligence, and integrity. Respect, caring, and fairness. The course offers specific, real-world situations that students can interpret and connect to these traits. Next, students practice spotting cases of bullying—including cyberbullying. The course describes how bullying can hurt everyone involved, and helps students develop a bullying-prevention mindset. This includes offering safe and appropriate ways to respond in real time. Finally, as members of their community and their country, students learn about their rights and duties as citizens.

Course Intro Video

Computer Basics (6-12)

This course helps students learn the basics of using computers. Students have the chance to improve their keyboard form, speed, and accuracy. At the same times, students work with common software programs, including word processors, spreadsheets, and presentations. The course also provides tips on navigating the internet. These include search tips, research ethics, and how to be safe online.

Gaming Unlocked (6-12)

In this course, the student becomes the gamemaster! Students learn the basics of gaming, from what makes games fun to what makes them work. Students explore all types of games in this course, including mental games, board games, and video games. The course focuses learning to recognize good gameplay mechanics and the steps necessary to produce a quality game.

 

This course does not require students to know or learn a programming language. The emphasis is on the history and design of games and the different careers available in the gaming industry.

Course Intro Video

Art History: Modern (9-12)

In this course, students journey into art history, beginning in the late 1700s. After studying Western movements, artworks, and architecture, students shift to a global perspective. The course includes travels to China, Japan, Africa, Oceania, Southeast Asia, India, and back to the Americas. Along the way, students have chances to respond personally to the art and share their insights with their peers.

 

Please be aware that this course includes depictions of nudity, as many art movements celebrated the human form. A number of important and influential works of art include nudity, and it would be nearly impossible to teach art history without including them. Given the subject matter, the course is extensively visual.

Course Intro Video

Art History: Origins (9-12)

In this course, students journey through time, learning about prehistoric and ancient art, Mediterranean and medieval art, all the way to the Renaissance and through to Rococo. Students also learn how to read art and interpret it on a basic level. Since art is best learned through experience and expression, students have the chance to see pieces of art and share their reactions. The goal of this course is to show how art relates to everyday life.

 

Given the subject matter, the course is extensively visual. Please also be aware that this course includes depictions of nudity, as many art movements celebrated the human form. Many important and influential works of art include nudity, and it would be nearly impossible to teach art history without including them.

Course Intro Video

Criminology & Forensics (9-12)

Criminology and Forensics is a beginner-level course on the topics of crime and forensic procedures. This course covers topics on crime and criminology, witnesses and perpetrators, and the crime lab. The course follows a story line of two college interns who discover a series of connected crimes in a suburban setting.

Criminology & Justice (9-12)

Criminology and Justice is a beginner-level course on criminal procedures. Students learn about the criminal justice system, non-forensic evidence, and what happens inside the courtroom. The course follows a story line of two college interns who discover a series of connected crimes and follow them through the justice procedures. This course addresses career readiness standards designed to introduce students to relevant CTE pathway(s).

Fashion Design (9-12)

First Semester:
Students learn about the tools and principles of fashion design. Students explore the use of color as they start to put together their own inspiration board. Next, students investigate the fabrics and materials that form the foundation of real-world fashion projects. Finally, students discover the tools and machines that fashion designers can use to bring their projects to life.

 

Second Semester:
Students learn what it takes to succeed in a career in the fashion industry. Students start this course by exploring the skills and education required in the world of fashion. Then, they research the wide variety of jobs in the industry. The course then goes over the key skills for success, like interviewing, workplace communication, and teamwork.

Course Intro Video

Graphic & Web Design (9-12)

This course is an introduction to how, through design, students can communicate visually. Each unit covers topics such as the principles of design, the ethics of creative fields, and the publishing proccess. This course takes a close look at a number of different jobs in design, providing a starting point for those looking to find a career.

Interior Design (9-12)

First Semester:
This semester introduces students to the fundamentals of interior design. The course starts with the principles and elements of design in general. Students also learn about the necessary skills, roles, and responsibilities of interior designers. Next comes the specifics, with a look at the many domains and specialties of interior design. Other topics includes the history of design, design materials, furniture, and accessories. Finally, the course turns to the future, looking at modern developments affecting interior design. These include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), universal design, and green design.

 

Second Semester:
This semester is designed for students who are considering interior design as a future career. It provides information on postsecondary options that are available to students, and it presents various career options in the major domains of design including residential, commercial, and mobile design. The importance of getting credentialed in interior design and getting involved in professional organizations is also discussed. An examination of the job market, how to write a résumé, and what kinds of questions are asked in an interview are also part of the content of the
course. Leadership, group dynamics, codes of ethics, and the importance of teamwork as these relate to interior design are topics that are expanded on. The concept of a growth mindset is included as well.

 

In-depth information regarding lighting, windows, walls, and floor treatments in residential and commercial designs as well as related information on materials, fabrication, and installation is presented. Furniture, upholstery, slipcovers, accessories, and textiles along with technology and its place in design are also discussed in-depth. A review of the elements and principles of design, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and universal design are also included. The business side of being an interior designer is explored and includes marketing, record keeping, and other necessary activities.

Course Intro Video

Photography Basics (9-12)

In Photography Basics, students learn the setup and proper use of photography equipment. This course is designed for any beginner interested in learning about photography. The course describes what it could take to start a career in this field. Through projects and research activities, students create and present a portfolio of work. In addition, students learn about the habits and etiquette that professional photographers need. Students do not need photography equipment to take the course. Instead, the course has opportunities to practice with digital simulations.

Course Intro Video

Principles of Marketing (9-12)

In Principles of Marketing, students explore the principles and career paths in marketing. The course describes the interactions between businesses, consumers, and the economy. After covering the economic basics, students move on to the role of marketing specifically. Next is a look at how marketers get their information. Then, students go over the process of creating a marketing plan, and the different careers in the field of marketing.

Course Intro Video

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Middle School Health (6-8)

This course provides an overview of how behavior affects health. The broad range of topics include nutrition and physical activity; growth, development, and sexual health; safety and injury prevention; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; mental, emotional, and social health; and personal and community health. Students explore how the choices they make about their bodies affect both their present and future. They are given the tools to make informed decisions to better their health.

Course Intro Video

Middle School Physical Education (6-8)

In this course, students explore the importance of physical activity. Students learn aspects of sports and recreation, including sportsmanship, leadership, and inclusivity. Safety while being active and developing lifelong healthy habits by encouraging daily activity they enjoy for lifelong fitness.

Course Intro Video

Health 101 (9-12)

This course provides an overview of how behavior affects health. Students learn about nutrition and physical activity; growth, development, and sexual health; injury and safety prevention; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; mental, emotional, and social health; and personal and community health. Students also explore how the choices they make about their bodies affect both their present and future. They are given tools to make informed decisions to better their health.

Course Intro Video

Physical Education (9-12)

First Semester:
In this semester, students learn about the importance of physical activity, personal fitness, and healthy eating habits, while also going over useful techniques and different aspects of sport and recreation. Throughout the course, students evaluate their own fitness, design an exercise plan, and track their results.

 

Second Semester:
In this semester, students explore key concepts that lead to improved fitness, wellness, and overall health. The course includes a survey-level description of the human body, including anatomy, physiology, and nutrition. Students also explore practical applications for these topics, including metabolism manipulation, correct exercise form, and effective programming that’s tailored to fit their personal health goals.

Course Intro Video

Personal Fitness (9-12)

First Semester:
Students explore key concepts from combative sports, gymnastics and tumbling, and a variety of team sports and activities. Students also focus on advanced fitness guidelines, motor skill development, game strategy, and the physical, emotional, and cognitive factors that affect performance. Throughout the course, students evaluate their own fitness by setting goals, designing an exercise plan, and tracking their results.

 

Second Semester:
Students explore how to develop physical fitness plans for themselves and others. They begin by learning how to assess fitness levels, as well as how to set and modify fitness goals. Students also
learn how to become smart consumers by evaluating fitness products and programs. In addition, they explore ways to become the best leaders they can be. Because this is a physical education course, students exercise throughout the entire course. They are given the freedom to participate in physical activities that they enjoy. To track their progress, they maintain a daily physical activity log.

Course Intro Video

LANGUAGE

Spanish 7

First Semester:
Students are introduced to the basics of the Spanish language by learning to introduce themselves! Through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, students learn to talk about interests and hobbies, ask for directions, and more. Students also learn about the cultures of some Spanish-speaking countries, including daily life in Mexico and the history of Colombia.

 

Second Semester:
Students continue getting the skills they need for speaking and interpreting Spanish. They learn to discuss activities they might enjoy with their friends, using vocabulary associated with restaurants, traveling, vacations, and much more. Students also start learning about Argentinian, Spanish, and Peruvian culture by exploring their history, cultural products, and traditions.

Course Intro Video

Spanish 8

First Semester:
Students learn how to discuss school subjects, various professions, and their daily routines as they continue to practice reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Spanish. In addition to learning the language, students dig into the cultures of some Spanish-speaking countries, including Venezuela and Chile.

 

Second Semester:
Students continue with the basics of the Spanish language through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students learn how to discuss illness and injuries, shopping, and money. In addition to learning the language, students also learn about the cultures of some Spanish speaking countries. They learn about the history, daily life, and cultural products of Ecuador, Guatemala, and Cuba.

Course Intro Video

Spanish 1 (7-12)

First Semester:
Students are introduced to the basics of the Spanish language through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students learn how to introduce themselves and others, talk about interests and hobbies, ask for directions, and more! Students also learn about the cultures of some Spanish-speaking countries. They learn about daily life in Mexico, the history of Spain, cultural traditions in Argentina, and more!

 

Second Semester:
Students continue with the introduction to the basics of Spanish language through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students learn how to discuss school subjects, various professions, daily routines, and likes and dislikes. In addition to learning the language, students also learn about the cultures of Venezuela, Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Cuba. Students learn about the history, traditions, and practices of each of these countries.

Course Intro Video

Spanish 2 (9-12)

First Semester:
Students continue to build on their understanding by reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students learn how to start and end conversations, ask questions, and discuss topics like social relationships, climate, animals, fables, holiday customs, and outdoor activities. Students even get the chance to write their own fable in Spanish. In addition to learning the language, students also learn about the cultures of Paraguay, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Bolivia. Students learn about the history, products, traditions, practices, and perspectives of each of these countries.

 

Second Semester:
Students continue to acquire the Spanish language through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students learn how to discuss transportation, extracurricular interests, professions, cuisine, clothing, health, and technology. Students are able to discuss these topics in the present, past, future, and conditional tenses, as well as the present subjunctive mood. In addition to learning the language, students also learn about the cultures of the Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Honduras, Uruguay, and Panama. Students learn about the historical figures, cultural products, traditions, practices, and perspectives of each of these countries.

Course Intro Video

Spanish 3 (9-12)

First Semester:
Students continue with their acquisition of the Spanish language through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students explore the topic of writing in Spanish by learning about informative, argumentative, and descriptive texts, as well as the creative writing process. The course also covers significant historical events in Spanish-speaking countries, as well as cultural products, practices, philosophies, and public spaces. Students are able to discuss these topics in the indicative and subjunctive moods as well as the imperative.

 

Second Semester:
Coming Soon

Course Intro Video

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